Hug the Bunny: Two Earl Grey Teas with Phoebe Wood

By Melissa Tutesigensi

I met with Phoebe Wood, writer and co-director of ‘Hug the Bunny’, at Edinburgh’s Half 8 Café. ‘Hug the Bunny’ was one of my favourite shows at this year’s Fringe and so I was keen to learn more about the genesis and development of the play. Although Phoebe was in the middle of the run with a few more shows to go, she agreed to let me pick her brain. We sat down to two Earl Grey Teas and chatted about drama school, leadership and experiences on the mile. Here is a selection of what came of our conversation.

 

Where it all began…

 

Norwich based Pits N Clits Theatre was formed very recently as Phoebe Wood, Damie Lemomu , Betsy Robertson, Sophie Abramovici, Sarah Pumphrey and Rachel Stone decided to create a feminist theatre company following their time at the University of East Anglia. Phoebe explained that, at the core, the company is a group of friends connected by their love and passion for driving compelling and entertaining feminist narratives forward. Each bring their own skills together to form the collective. Phoebe is always keen to stress the input of her team and to highlight that there is a real mix and variance of skills. Phoebe herself wrote the script but worked with fellow co-director Rachel Stone to help bring it alive. You only have to watch the play to see that there is a wealth of talent in the production company, that this a group of capable young women who understand the multi-faceted and multi-dimensional nature of theatre.

 

Explaining the title, Hug the Bunny…

 

I asked Phoebe about the origin of the name of the play as it didn’t seem too obvious to me. Concerned that I had completely missed a major symbol or metaphor, I was itching to know why the play is called ‘Hug the Bunny’. According to Phoebe, to ‘hug the bunny’ means to masturbate with a vibrator– an apt choice for the play given that female masturbation is an important part of the history on the study of hysteria. The popular school of thought of previous centuries held that women, being the fairer sex, were prone to fits of hysteria, a demonstration of their uniquely female facilities. Female masturbation was used to treat the symptoms of hysteria which up until the mid 20th century was categorised as a disease. Female masturbation is important to the play and fundamental in showing historical examples of the mans-plaining of the female sexual experience.

 

Twist, turns, trials and tribulations lead to triumph…

 

One of the revelations that surprised me the most about ‘Hug the Bunny’s’ journey to the Fringe is that it was never really meant to happen. Phoebe described how the original play she had written to take to the Fringe had to be replaced. She wrote ‘Hug the Bunny’ in a month, had to subsequently re-organise arrangements with the venues and marketing all the while raising the money to fund the project. Once the play was written and they were looking like they would meet the fundraising goal, she was still left with minor amendments such as finalising the title of the play. Things had to be scaled down and altered as they adjusted to their practical and financial restrictions. As pervasive as these obstacles were however, so was the company’s determination. It was their resilience and attitude of taking things in their stride that got them to the Fringe in the end. As I watched ‘Hug the Bunny’, I was blown away by its accuracy and honesty. The effortlessness of the play could easily fool you into thinking that it was a simple and predetermined process from idea to performance, but instead it was a product of a beautiful creative mess.

 

It’s not all fun and games on the mile…

 

Having cleared the logistical and creative hurdles of getting to the Fringe, they then faced the next challenge of attracting people to the show. They had already made waves in drawing an audience online through their use of social media ‘Crowdfunder’ but Edinburgh was a different platform altogether. The mile is a frenzy, awash with marketing of extreme levels with the aim of attracting people’s attention. They stood in the sea of actors, dancers and comedians, facing the struggle of drawing in the crowds. Phoebe is honest about the difficulty of being faced with this and explains that they had to employ their adjustment tactics to change their approach when they realised that their initial ideas for advertising weren’t striking the right chord with passers-by. It’s not an easy thing to approach people with thorny subjects like feminism and hysteria, explains Phoebe. She understands that its not to everyone’s taste. She’s aware of the fact that people have different opinions and reactions to theatre having been in the situation of being the only one in a group disliking a show. Nonetheless, it’s difficult to take that in as a writer.

 

There is life beyond the fringe…

 

We ended our conversation on the subject of future plans. She told me that her immediate plans for the future were to survive and enjoy the rest of her time in Edinburgh. Post-Fringe, it’s safe to say that Pits N Clits Theatre more than just survived, they thrived managing to pick up more five star reviews and a mention in Dazed Magazine piece ‘Eight plays we wish we’d seen as teenagers’ . The Fringe is a relentless experience for any first-time act but I hope Pits N Clits Theatre took away a sense of achievement as they packed up and prepared to leave the city. Whatever they have in store, I bet this won’t be the last we’ve heard from them.

 

 


Shower Thoughts: The Show We’re Still Talking About

Charlie Norton speaks to the cast and crew behind this overwhelming student success at the Fringe 2018.

 

In typical student fashion, composer Lavie Rabinovitz effusively tells me, ‘Shower Thoughts’ was a brainchild of the small hours: ‘it all started with a message at two or three in the morning’. The idea was to explore the bathroom as a private place for personal revelations, librettist Ryan Hay explains, ‘so we put together a list of all the things that might happen in the bathroom and chose the ones we found interesting’.

 

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‘Shower Thoughts’ follows five university flatmates as they reflect on university life in private and shared moments in their ‘grotty’ student bathroom. The song-cycle explores a breadth of contemporary issues – from mental illness to body hair – whilst sustaining the energy of a real student house through comic musical exchanges between the friends.

 

Though the setting is unique, Rabinovitz is keenly aware that the flat-share premise is familiar: ‘We talked extensively about the flat dynamics because we were really petrified of rewriting Friends. We wanted to write real people.’ To this end, perhaps riskily, the roles were cast before the piece was finished and the actors’ real-life personalities used as inspiration. This explains Iona Smith’s effortless charisma as Flick, the joker of the bunch. Meanwhile, Stephanie Herron’s incredibly poignant performance as Sophie is somewhat explained by her co-writing of the powerful and nuanced solo about eating disorder which, she explains, ‘is authentic to my experiences’.

 

In Hay’s words, ‘it’s important to understand that you’re writing from a perspective but to feel empowered [by it].’ As students of St Andrews themselves, the cast and crew have an obvious proximity to the fictional environment. Amy Addinall’s set design has a self-professed ‘grotty’ aesthetic ‘just like everyone’s bathroom at Uni’, which hilariously lends itself to Rachel Brown’s drunken crouching over the toilet bowl as the unlucky-in-love Ang, as well as a Kate Nash-esque ditty about body hair and self-acceptance from Sara Pearce’s Eva.

 

But this is not to say the actors are playing themselves. In fact, I choke on my water in surprise when Connor Norris who plays Jonny, a young typically English man repressed by the social implications of masculinity, has a strong American accent. On top of this, Herron and Pearce describe some teething issues with their portrayal of a gay relationship.

 

Herron: Definitely, for a couple of rehearsals, we were having a hard time figuring out, er…

Hay: Logistics?

Jess Cooper (director): Haha! Yeah, we had to have a wee ‘logistics chat’.

Pearce: One day we did a run and then Jess took us aside and said ‘Guys, let’s talk about physical intimacy’.

Cooper: I’m a queer woman myself and for me it was just a relationship!

 

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Of her naturalistic directing, Cooper says the cast had to ‘work against the desire to “perform” the content, [so as] to make the audience feel like they were prying.’ For a cast of opera singers and musical theatre fanatics alike this apparently proved a challenge. The show involves no jazz hands and no dazzling choreography; rather the character development and the themes explored are at the centre of the piece. This placed some burden on the cast, Norris says: ‘I really wanted to make sure I did the issue justice.’ Yet it is this empathetic and thoughtful handling of contemporary issues which makes ‘Shower Thoughts’ so impactful.

 

Rabinovitz sums up the sentiment of the piece: ‘if you can express those emotions in the bathroom, why can’t you do so everywhere else – open the door!’ And, Hay tells me, the door is not closed on ‘Shower Thoughts’, with an upcoming run booked on home turf as well as an ambition for a national tour. Having seen the show myself I can confirm it is absolutely worth a watch, and I’m only more convinced of this having had the chance to speak to such a passionate group of creatives.

 


First Time at the Fringe: Five Tips

By Megan Denny

 

 

Fringe first-timer? You’ll need this advice…

 

1. Navigation

Even if you’ve visited Edinburgh outside of August, Google Maps will become your new best friend as the city is turned upside down during the Fringe. When your phone inevitably runs out of charge by lunchtime, be prepared to resort to a good, old-fashioned paper map to locate that obscure, back-of-pub venue. Even better, ask for directions from Fringe regulars or locals who know all the shortcuts.

 

2. Planning – not too much

Booking some shows isn’t a bad idea, particularly more well-known productions which can sell out far in advance. However, be prepared to go with the Fringe flow and be flexible. If you find yourself with some spare hours between booked shows, have a wander down the Royal Mile, pick up a few flyers and chat to people promoting their shows. Look at the many posters on bus stops, lamposts and phone boxes, or go to venues and read the listings displayed outside. If anything catches your eye, go for it – who knows, it may be the best thing you see at the Fringe.

 

3. Waterproofs

Seriously – preferably head-to-toe, or at least clothes that dry quickly (i.e. not denim). Layers are also a good idea as storm turns to summer sunshine within the space of 15 minutes… such is Edinburgh’s climate.

 

4. Get talking

A major part of the Fringe relies on word of mouth, so get involved! If you enjoyed a show, spread the word. Tell the people who made and performed it – they will really appreciate it. Help them out by recommending their show to people who you bump into in coffee shops, on the Mile or via social media. You will probably also receive some great recommendations of shows to see in return.

 

5. Sleeping, eating, drinking 

Embrace the alternative reality of Edinburgh Fringe, but remember do the ‘normal things’: sleep (for at least a few hours), eat (vegetables), and drink (water) – then you can’t go far wrong.

 

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Comedy on an Extinct Volcano with Barry Ferns

By Louis Harnett O’Meara

 

On August 18 Arthur’s Seat underwent a change. Hundreds of people trekked their way to the top of the hill and placed their buttocks squarely on the pebbled floor. A man with the look of Curt Cobain and Richard Branson’s love child stood before the gathering crowd. And so they waited.

 

“I am Barry Ferns, and it is time to enter the venue!” Curt Branson announced, and gestured to the door that stood beside him. “Please form an orderly line, and mind your heads coming in; it’s low in there.”

 

Barry entered first, before the crowd milled down the slope to the entrance and passed into the venue one by one behind him. Each man, woman and child took their place and sat expectantly before a speaker and a microphone – and Barry took his place before them.

 

“We have three acts lined up for you this afternoon everyone. Welcome, to Arthur’s Seat.”

 

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I approached Barry after the show, and he suggested we grab a drink at the Starbucks just down the hill. It was surprisingly quiet – but then I suppose people wouldn’t come all this way just for a cup of coffee. Comedy, on the other hand…

 

How long have you been doing this?

I started running shows on top of Arthur’s Seat in 2007, 11 years ago now. The first show was called ‘Arthur’s Seat Belongs to Lionel Ritchie’. I changed my name to Lionel Ritchie for it – it was my name for seven years.

Like most of my comedy, it just came from a ridiculous idea. I just think Lionel Ritchie is a ridiculous man, and the idea of doing a show on top of Arthur’s Seat is just too ridiculous not to do.

 

How has the show developed?

The basic idea hasn’t changed much. Originally it was just a very small show; there were only around 20 people there. I’ve never advertised it, but it seems to have spread a lot just by word of mouth. This time there were about 250.

Back in 2012 and 2013 I performed a show every day for the whole run of the Fringe – I’d drag an amplifier, a mic., a door and a bag of comedy gear up every single day.

 

You managed to drag up three comedians to perform this year. How do you choose them?

They’re just my favourites. Tony Law’s been up a lot. The first time he came up his kids did a stand up set as well. I’ve had Simon Munnery, Josie Long, Rich Fulcher, who was Mighty Boosh at the time.

 

What if someone else was to decide they wanted to put on a show on Arthur’s Seat?

Well they’d have to talk to me, I’m the venue manager! It’s ridiculous. It’s a difficult one to put on your CV though – “What do you do?” “I manage an extinct volcano.”

 

How do you think the Fringe has changed?

Back in the 80s, 90s, early 2000s you would find a lot more oddballs at the Fringe. You didn’t know what you were going to get. People have much more of an idea of the Fringe as a career move these days. If you want to become a comedian you go to the Fringe, perform a sell-out run, get booked onto ‘Nine out of Ten Cats’ then you perform your tour.

You still get the Free Fringe, but there’s a lot more of the slick West End style shows now, and they cost a lot of money. The financial cost of it all means audiences and shows are less willing to take risks with what they see or what they put on.

 

When you started your show on Arthur’s Seat was it in response to the commercialization you saw happening?

It wasn’t in response in a direct sense, but it’s in the same vein as 1980s Fringe. It’s a ridiculous idea put on by a ridiculous person. I just love doing odd things. In 2012 I won the Hardy award for making a load of fake reviews for fake shows. I just printed them out and stuck them all over Edinburgh. I gave myself a six star review in one of them. People would come up the hill like, “excuse me, is this the place for the show with the six star review?” It’s amazing the stuff people believe just because it’s been written down.

 

Are you going to see anything interesting this evening?

Arthur Smith is hosting an unofficial tour of the Royal Mile at Midnight tonight only. He’s been doing it for years. It’s not your normal tour; someone nearly always ends up getting naked. He got arrested once for nearly starting a riot. When Nelson Mandela was still in prison he convinced everyone to crowd outside Leith police station where he told them Nelson was being held. He had the whole crowd of them chanting “Free Nelson, free Nelson!” Utterly ridiculous.


Timpsons: The Musical

By Claire Richardson

 

‘Timpsons: The Musical’. If you just thought of Timpsons: the high street cobbler, you are correct. Energetic, creative, and completely ridiculous, it’s a musical parody of Shakespeare’s tragedy ‘Romeo and Juliet’. Written by Warwick students Sam Cochrane and Chris Baker, and performed by the new company ‘Gigglemug Theatre’, it’s exactly the sort of show the Fringe encourages.

On the Royal Mile each day, I spotted the team with Timpsons flyers, wearing shoe-shaped headdresses and Timpson aprons. Intrigued, I caught up with lead actors Robert Madge and Sabrina Messer, to discover the key to this musical. With just a week left, Sabrina remains convinced that their performance is always their favourite hour of the day – ‘although, half an hour before the show, we look like zombies,’ Rob laughs.

 

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We begin with mutual, ironic grumbles as to a lack of sets of keys in crammed Fringe apartments this summer, before Rob abridges the musical. ‘It’s a bonkers but brilliant exploration of how shoes and keys came together to form the nation’s favourite cobblers – as mad as it sounds!’ The pair play Monty Montashoe and Keeleigh Keypulet, inventors and star-crossed lovers, in this (fictional!) depiction of Timpsons Ltd’s origins, 1865. The musical darts between the set of two wooden wagons; home of the feuding family businesses seeking glory at the ‘Invention Convention’.

I ask how Shakespeare might react. ‘Absolutely not turning in his grave,’ says Rob, with a grin. ‘Definitely – he was up for a laugh!’ Sabrina agrees. And what did Timpsons Ltd have to say? ‘We don’t work for Timpsons,’ Rob insists, ‘but everyone thinks that we do – we’re actors!’. The writers wrote for permission, and received generous funding for half of the show, but Sam and Chris had completed the musical long before. At the end each show, money is raised for the Alex Timpson Trust, established in 2017, to continue Alex Timpson’s work supporting children in care – in her lifetime, she fostered over 300 children.

Rob comments on first receiving their script that ‘you can’t quite believe you’re reading it. It’s so mad – and requires commitment. You can’t do the jokes half-heartedly, or they’d fall flat’. This includes posing a key as a ‘mini saw’ and a door as a ‘human catflap’ at the ‘Invention Convention’, while belting their anthems ‘Hole in my Sole’ and ‘It’s a Tingle’. Despite week-long rehearsals every month for half the year, there have still been alterations in Edinburgh. ‘A whole song at the start was cut,’ Rob tells us, ‘it was snappier to go straight in’.

The writers and lyricists are also performers in the subplot. Bouncing about in black leotards, they play characters in two love stories – that of the family servants, commenting on social class, and the most hilarious physical sketch of the relationship between two fisherman. While the future of ‘Timpsons: The Musical’ is unknown, Sabrina is convinced that the next move from Sam and Chris will undoubtably ‘be a bit wacky – it won’t be straight-laced’.

Certainly, this musical is a slice of quintessential Fringe. Ridiculous on paper, and brilliant when brought to the stage – it just needed the right team, and the high street’s cobbler, to ‘unlock potential’.


5 Films to Cure Your Post Fringe Blues

By Olivia Cooke

Missing the Fringe already? Fear not, these films are the perfect remedies to fill that place in your heart left void by the lack of regular viewing. So, take your seats and settle back for a movie-marathon.

Trainspotting (1 & 2) (1996, 2017)

Danny Boyle’s iconic 1996 black comedy and its 2017 sequel, start our list with an adrenaline- fuelled bang. The opening scenes of Ewan McGregor and Ewen Bremner sprinting down Princes Street to Iggy Pop’s Lust for Life, will always be held as one of the greatest moments in British cinematic history. Although the majority of both films were filmed in Glasgow, no other film in the modern era has been able to champion the Scottish capital in all its glory. Strap yourself in for a visceral junkie ride through Edinburgh to the pounding, relentless rhythm of Underworld’s Born Slippy reverberating through your ears.

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Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)

The iconic parade scene alone justifies a viewing of John Hughes’ magnificently upbeat masterpiece. Matthew Broderick’s infectiously fun performance of The Beatles’ Twist and Shout on a parade float reminds me of walking up the Royal Mile and seeing all the Fringe come together in one huge spectacle of comedy, dance and theatre.

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Sunshine on Leith (2013)

This feel-good musical set to the songs of the Proclaimers is a guaranteed pick-me-up after a long withdrawal from any Fringe action. Led by charismatic performances from George MacKay and Antonia Thomas, Sunshine on Leith spins a Mamma-Mia style narrative of love, heartbreak, revelations and reunions. With a musical number in front of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery and picturesque shots of cobbled streets off Regents Bridge, this film certainly shows off Edinburgh in a wholesomely sun-drenched light.

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Airplane! (1980)

Airplane! feels like it wouldn’t go amiss as some sort of satirical comedy playing at the Assembly Rooms. Its surrealist and fast-paced slapstick comedy holds you in a hypnotic trance, leaving your sides splitting after an hour and a half of non-stop gags. To put it simply, this film is a pure delight. Its dry, witty, and deadpan humour can probably be found in some of the best comedy performances at the Fringe.

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The Illusionist (2010)

Edinburgh-based animator Sylvain Chomet casts a spell over his adopted home town, taking us on a journey to the city’s 1950s past. Written as a love-letter to his long-lost daughter, Chomet’s film is based off a screenplay by French mime actor Jacques Tati. It tells the story of a struggling illusionist who befriends a young woman, who in turn becomes convinced that he possesses genuine magical powers. For fans of Studio Ghibli and Pixar, stunning sequences of Old Town and the Castle are guaranteed to whet your appetite for all things aesthetically animated. A beautiful and unforgettable film.

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From behind closed (toilet) doors and onto the stage: Feminism at the Fringe

By Siobhán Stack-Maddox 

 

Kicking off with Katy Dye’s ‘Baby Face’ and ending with Cows and Kisses and Mind Out Theatre’s ‘The Ladies Loo Chronicles’, my week at the Fringe was nicely sandwiched by two very different, but both very powerful, pieces of feminist theatre. The power of these female performances made a lasting impression; both pieces are bold, with a definite shock factor, compelling audiences to reflect. I spoke to the cast and producers of ‘Chronicles’ about the inspiration behind their piece and their experience of performing at the Fringe.

 

“Daring, blunt, funny and unapologetic”: this is the kind of theatre co-producer Evangeline Osbon wanted to create when she set up Mind Out Theatre and these words perfectly sum up ‘Chronicles’. The comedy, which takes place in a club toilet, questions and breaks taboos whilst valorising female friendship and experience. Sharing Osbon’s desire to create “work with, by and for women”, Flora London, the show’s writer and co-producer who also plays the character of Megan, founded Cows and Kisses Theatre Company this year with the aim of “writing for real women”. London recalls bonding experiences in women’s club toilets on nights out as inspiring her to write a piece which brings women and their stories “out of the toilet and onto the stage”.

 

Disclaimer: although the play takes place in the eponymous ‘Ladies’ Loo’, ‘Chronicles’ is definitely not exclusively aimed at women. Osbon emphasises how impressed she has been by the show’s mixed audience demographic at the Fringe, both in terms of gender and age, including a large proportion of over-50s. Evangeline Dickson, who plays Lydia, notes how “creatively satisfying” it is to be part of a show which addresses such a broad audience and creates a dialogue surrounding the issues it explores.

 

As well as the witty writing, comic timing and energetic dance pieces, to which Osbon attributes the show’s broad appeal, ‘Chronicles’ pushes both theatrical and sociopolitical boundaries and raises questions surrounding class differences, the tampon tax and the Windrush generation. London explains that she wanted to explore “real women’s” thoughts and experiences of these issues. This kind of boundary pushing is fundamentally important at an exciting time of “evolving” and experimental theatre, according to Osbon. As roles within productions become “more fluid”, without distinctly separate writers or performers, theatre is developing into “a more creative, collaborative process”. The ‘Chronicles’ team agree that Edinburgh is the perfect place for creating and performing “more exciting theatre” which combines different mediums and challenges convention. Dickson enthuses about the city’s “buzzy, inspiring” atmosphere, which fuels the “need to create and collaborate”.

 

So, what’s next after the Fringe for the ‘Chronicles’ ladies? “We’d love to get in a toilet!” says London. They are already looking into collaborating with different venues, including clubs and bars. Watch this space: ‘Chronicles’ may be coming soon to a loo near you…

 

See my review of ‘Baby Face’:  http://edfringereview.com/r/W09kF9LcT-y_MEmrXDx6yg

‘Baby Face’ is on until 26th August at Summerhall at 13:30.
The ‘Chronicles’ team is raising money for Tommy’s and Sands stillbirth and neonatal death charities. They would like to thank their partner, organic intimacy company ‘YES’ and Alra drama school, especially the caretaker, Darren.

 

 


Emma Dean: the woman behind the unicorn

 

By Claire Richardson and Kathryn Tann

 

When we met Emma Dean at the start of the month (shout-out to Greenside for a wonderful show speed-dating event) her rainbow spangled garments and vivacious enthusiasm for music made her shine. We sent some reviewers, they gave five stars, and so we went to see for ourselves what was on the other side of this rainbow. “It’s a show for anyone who’s ever been heartbroken”, Emma tells people when she hands out flyers. It contains everything from beautiful ballads, to cheeky fetishes, to her anthem of the summer – “I’m a f*cking unicorn.”

m205x285_ffffff“Sometimes, when you’re in your darkest moments the littlest thing can speak to you.” Emma found her mantra in a simple blog post, and it has become her buoyancy aid. “I’ve not found anything else quite like it.” And so Emma embraced her past pains, put a ‘magical horn on her head’, and boldly built a show around her heartbreak.

But it dawns on us that not everyone has experienced heartbreak. Emma agrees – she says she’s learnt a lot about her show through flyering – some will scoff, happily married and uninterested in such a show. But the singer goes on to make the point that even so, everyone has felt insecure, has needed a boost of self-worth, has had friendships fail. These are issues everyone faces, and with ‘Broken Romantics’, Emma hopes to give a little light. The show is metaphor which lets the audience make up their mind – you can interpret Emma’s unicorn horn as you please.

So from this mantra, how did Emma then write her songs? She says her writing process is hard to explain; ‘it just happens’. But she does talk about the ‘I Heart Songwriting Club’ back in Brisbane, which helped springboard a number of our favourite ‘Broken Romantic’ songs.

While Emma might, on stage, be a rainbow clad, horn-wearing unicorn, she sits down with us as a friendly, relatable, and even (as she admits herself) slightly shy singer-songwriter. “The Fringe has always been on the bucket list… We raised a portion and I just saved the rest. And here we are.” She tells us that back home she runs a community choir with her brother, and then recounts all sorts of amazing stories about singing at the recent Commonwealth Games, entertaining children by day, even opening big-name drag shows in New York! Having come all the way from Australia, we imagined Emma’s large suitcase might be brimming with rainbow tights and glittery makeup, but she assures us that her dazzling costumes are quite separate from her usual attire. Apart from the hair: that’s always one bright colour or another.

‘Broken Romantics: A Unicorn’s Quest for Love’ is a quintessential fringe piece – brilliant, weird, touching and hilarious, all at once. Unicorns are a familiar symbol in popular culture at the present; emblazoned across t-shirts and decorating stationary. And here are a lot of shows about heartbreak at the Fringe, and most of them manifested in sarcastic stand up. Emma escapes gimmicky unicorns and bitter comedy, and instead creates this glittering, musical masterpiece that we think everyone, not just the heartbroken, should see.

 

You can catch ‘Broken Romantics: A Unicorn’s Quest for Love’ at Greenside @ Infirmary St until the 25th August (7.35pm). 

 


Marmite: An interview with writers Phoebe and Hal

By Ella Kemp

 

After their internationally touring Fringe 2017 sell-out Ginger Beer, Limerence Productions have bounded back onto the Fringe scene this year to bring us ‘Marmite’, a tenderly honest exploration of gay polyamory. Between overseeing rehearsals and photographing male models with marmite spread over their torsos, the creators of this play, writers Phoebe and Hal, took some time out to give us a taster of ‘Marmite’

 

 

So, Marmite is led by two protagonists, Dylan and Eddie. Can you give me brief profiles of Dylan and Eddie? What are they like as people, how do their personalities match and differ?

Phoebe: Dylan is twenty-one, outgoing and confident. He’s very successful with guys but has never had a long-term relationship. Eddie is twenty-three, anxious and introverted. He has been in relationships before but always seems to get screwed over by them. I think that’s what makes them work: their personalities are incredibly different but ultimately compliment one another. Even though they are so different, I feel that in many ways they are on very similar journeys. They’re trying to work out how to be in a gay relationship which can be an incredibly confusing thing.

 

 

The play explores the difficulties of gay monogamy. Do you personally hold any particularly strong opinions with regards to what you think are some of the most difficult aspect of gay monogamy in today’s climate?

Hal: I think the biggest pressure, really, is the assumption that if you are in a same-sex relationship, you are/should be monogamous. When same-sex marriage was legalised, everybody assumed that all same-sex couples want to model their relationships after heterosexual ones. And that’s just not the case.

On the other hand, there are prominent voices within the gay male community who argue that gay people should deliberately be non-monogamous because ‘why would we want to be like a straight couple?’. I think both sides can be very alienating and make the process of learning how to be in a relationship very hard.

 

 

Do you think there is much (or any) homogeneity between different people’s experiences of gay monogamy in the UK? To what extent does Marmite present difficulties that most gay couples will relate to or have experienced themselves?

Phoebe: It’s hard to say because every relationship is different, whether you’re straight, or not. I do think that gay men’s relationships get more positive reactions from people who are trying to be allies. There’s a lot of people saying ‘you guys are so cute together’ and you’re very aware that nobody is saying that about the straight couple at the table.

 

 

Do you expect (or hope) audience members to leave with altered perspectives?

Hal: Personally, I don’t want them to come away from Marmite with any particular viewpoint. The show is more about presenting this issue as a topic of discussion and debate, we don’t want to come down on any position.

 

Now the slick promotion certainly doesn’t tell of the immense effort that goes into bringing a play to the Fringe. What were the most significant challenges that you faced during the marketing and production of this play?

Phoebe: The biggest challenge we’ve found is trying to live up to our success last year. Last year’s show (Ginger Beer) did better than we’d expected and now we feel a lot of pressure to live up to that.

 

And finally, why “Marmite”? What is the significance of this title?

Hal: It’s taken from the homophobic slur ‘marmite muncher’. We did the same thing with last year’s show, Ginger Beer, which is cockney rhyming slang for ‘queer’. We think it’s a really simple and effective way to reclaim the words used against queer people.

 

 

‘Marmite’ is on at 15:00 every day in the Gilded Balloon Rose Theatre. If you heed just one piece of advice at the Fringe this year then let it be this: DON’T MISS THIS PLAY!


Coffee Shops and Cafes: Five Special Spots in Edinburgh

By Beatrix Swanson Scott 

 

Edinburgh’s lighthouse within the Fringe storm has to be its profusion of excellent coffee shops – whether you’re after cute and cozy, cool and swanky or (very) hipster, every part of town seems to have excellent spots on offer. I’ve spent a lot of time typing up reviews, trawling the Fringe programme or simply recharging my batteries (literal and figurative) in Edinburgh’s many cafes. Rather than acting as a definitive guide to the best, this article offers up a selection of five of the city’s coffee shops that are dear to me for one reason or another.

 

cafes

 

 

Lovecrumbs – 155 West Port 

This spot on West Port near Edinburgh College of Art had to be first on the list. Lovecrumbs, which until recently served only cake, is an Edinburgh institution. I recommend the warming cardamom hot chocolate to go with your sweet treats – it tastes especially good when balanced on the old piano which serves as one of the café’s random assortment of tables. Otherwise, the sought-after window seat is a rather cool place to hang out (once you’ve manoeuvred yourself into it).

 

Peter’s Yard – Quartermile 

Peter’s Yard is where I had brunch on my 18th birthday in September 2015 – I had stayed on a while after the Fringe that year. This Scandinavian-inspired bakery-café’s pastries are delicious; I especially like the cardamom buns. Right on the meadows, it’s a lovely central place to go for a light meal – and I am told their pizzas are amazing as well.

 

Filament – 38 Clerk Street 

I discovered this place back when it was located in India Buildings on Victoria Street – the window seats at the back of the high-ceilinged, cleanly hipster shop provided a welcome oasis around the corner from the hubbub of the Royal Mile. I took a shine to the unique name, and therefore went back when it moved to smaller premises on diverse, studenty Clerk Street. Though the move meant losing those wonderful ceilings, it’s still a great place to go for a bite and a well-made coffee.

 

Press Coffee – 30 Buccleuch Street 

This cute little place just around the corner from George Square (perfect for Fringe staff) serves good coffee and breakfasts, in an atmosphere that’s always friendly and bustling. I’ve done a lot of early-morning writing here. I recommend the delicious scones with jam and clotted cream. Bonus: their blue china on marble table has great Instagram value!

 

Mary’s Milk Bar – 19 Grassmarket 

Alright, this isn’t really a coffee shop. But there was no way I could leave it off the list. One of my favourite ice cream places in the world, this little place on the Grassmarket serves an eclectic rotating selection of homemade gelatos (from ‘Tea & Jam’ to ‘Candied Violet’) with distinctly vintage flair. Milkshakes, hot chocolate floats and, yes, coffee, are also available, and I promise that once you’ve braved the inevitable queue the first time, you’ll be back again and again.